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Dvorsky speaks for Darwin Day

Across the world, people will be gathering on or about Feb. 12 to celebrate Darwin Day.

The purpose of this annual event is to promote public education about science and to encourage the celebration of science and humanity.

The Halton-Peel Humanist Community is joining with the Mississauga Freethought Association to present George Dvorsky speaking on Cyborgs of the Past, Present and Future: an overview of cybernetic technologies, the merging of humans with machines and the coming cyborg revolution.

Dvorsky's primary concern is the ethical and sociological impacts of emerging technologies, specifically, human enhancement technologies, seeks to promote open discussion for the purposes of education and foresight.

Celebrating Darwin Day

Join the Halton-Peel Humanist Community on January 31

 

Across the world, people will be gathering on or about February 12 to celebrate Darwin Day. 
For more than 20 years, Darwin collected vast amounts of scientific data, which he examined in great depth in search of a mechanism that permitted life to change over time.  Eventually, he explained that the primary underlying mechanism was natural selection.

The Halton-Peel Humanist Community and the Mississauga Freethought Association is presenting an entertaining and informative talk, by George Dvorsky: “Cyborgs of the Past, Present and Future: an overview of cybernetic technologies, the merging of humans with machines and the coming cyborg revolution” 

Banning books just a bad idea, says activist

The banning of the controversial novel The Golden Compass by a neighbouring school board will only entice more children to want to read it, says the Mississauga man who is vice-chair of the Halton Peel Humanist Community. And "Pope Benedict XVI is taking the church back into the medieval dark ages," by calling on film distributors not to promote the film, says Kevin Saldanha.

Humanist responds

Re: Humanist reaction to book review offended some Catholics    (Oakville Beaver,  Dec. 5) 
The letter writer missed the main objection that I have concerning the action of the Halton Catholic Disrict School Board and  fantasy book  The Golden Compass.  My central concern is that the book was removed from general circulation because the author is an atheist.  Had the book been removed because of the content of the book, then that would have been a different issue. 
 As a retired teacher, I am aware that some material and some concepts are not appropriate for all age groups. The central function of a publicaly funded school system is to develop critical thinking in all students. That is not possible unless opposing views are examined. That is why, for example, I included debating in my classes.