Our News

Humanists discuss climate change

Climate Change In Halton-Peel - A Time To Act will be the topic of the Halton Halton-Peel Humanist Community meeting on Tuesday, May 20.

The meeting will take place at 7:30 p.m. at the Oakville Town Hall located at 1225 Trafalgar Rd.

Peter Orphanos, chair of the Peel Region Chapter of the Sierra Club, will be the guest speaker.

Orphanos is called upon regularly by municipalities for advice on how to create sustainable neighbourhoods while reducing dependency on non-renewable resources.

Council reaches compromise on prayer

Oakville councillors, who want to, will continue to ask God for guidance before sitting down to their council meetings.

Those for and against removing the non-denominational prayer spoken at the beginning of council, and replacing it with a moment of silence were able to reach a compromise during Monday night's council meeting everyone could live with.

The councillors voted unanimously to keep the prayer and also to add a moment of silence afterwards for those who do not wish to partake.

Enola responds to letters

In all fairness, I would like to reply to some of the specific claims/attacks printed in the March 6 issue of North Oakville Today.  

The first letter said, "As for Elka Enola, it is unfortunate that she can think only of herself."  I have no idea where that comment comes from.  It is referenced to nothing and is, of course, patently false.  

To describe me as a selfish self centred person, which is what someone who "can think only of herself" means, is hurtful in the least, and might even be libelous. 

In fact, my position, like that of Humanists, is the complete opposite.  We support inclusiveness.  We believe that all public events should be fully inclusive and that no one should be made to feel left out. 

'Atheists have rights too'

I would like to comment on some of the recent letters about opening council and other meetings with prayer.  There was a time when Canada was almost 100 percent Christian in its religious outlooks.  Today that is not the case.

In fact, apart from practicing and nominal Christians, non-believers, atheists and humanists make up the second largest identifiable group within the Canadian mosaic, some 16 per cent according to the 2001 Canadian census.  Believers of other faiths (Jews, Muslims, Hindus, Jains, etc.) make up another 10 per cent.